Songbirds

Fledgling Northern Flickers
Fledgling Northern Flickers

1)  It is not true that if a human touches a baby bird, its mother will desert it.

2) If the baby is naked and unable to stand, put it back in its nest. Be sure it is the right nest. If the nest has fallen to the ground, put it in a margarine tub with a couple of holes punched in the bottom and secure it in the tree. If the nest was destroyed, make a new one from a margarine tub (poke a couple of holes in the bottom for rain drainage) and line it with grass. It may take 1-2 hours for a parent to return.

3) If the baby is well-feathered and able to perch, it is a fledgling and is supposed to be out of the nest. Put it on a branch in tree or bush within 5 feet of where you found it. A parent is probably close by. If the youngster is in the street, herd it back to the nearest bush.

4) Never give baby birds liquids.

5) Baby birds must be fed every 30 minutes from dawn to dusk. Like any babies, their diet at this age is vital to their development. It is very important if the babies are not able to be returned to their nest that you contact us so that we can give the birds the care they need to successfully live in their natural habitat.

6) If you have an interest in baby birds please consider volunteering with us we could use you!

Ducklings

Two mallard ducklings. One was brought to the center after it fell off a local high school. Occasionally, ducks will build nests on roofs. Unfortunately, one of these ducklings had a seizure on Thursday night and died shortly afterwards.
Mallard ducklings.

1) Ducks lay 1 egg daily for a total of up to 14 eggs. Ducks do not incubate the eggs until they have laid the full clutch. If you find a clutch of eggs that looks abandoned, it is possible that the mother has not finished laying and has not started incubating yet.

2) As soon as all ducklings are born and dry their mother leads them to the nearest pond. If the family needs assistance in reaching the water, please give us a call (761-9640) and we’ll talk about the best way to help.

If you want to do more, come join us as a volunteer. Above, Bird Center Director, Carol Akerlof leads a wild bird rehabilitation training session.
If you want to do more, come join us as a volunteer. Above, Bird Center Director, Carol Akerlof leads a wild bird rehabilitation training session.